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What is Trekking?

Trekking

What is Trekking????


Trekking means a journey undertaken on foot for sight seeing in areas where modern transport system is not normally available. A walk of a few or more days through the hills of Nepal will not only give you a view of the mountains, but also take you through remote villages inhabited by hospitable people.
We invite you to join us on visit to this remote region to see the truth of your dream.

Trekking Styles


There are very various ways of trekking through Himalayan range of Nepal. When is planing a trek you need to think carefully about different styles of trekking available. Remember that when hiking in any major range of the mountains, it makes sense to go with at least one chosen companion, as a slip or a sprained ankle could occur at any time. It is also prudent to register with your embassy before setting off, and to sign in at any police checkpoint along the way.

Tea House Trek ( Lodge Trek):


Tea house trek is the most independent way of adventures trip in Nepal Tea house trekking is the most popular form of trekking along the many established trails in the Himalayas. It involves stopping each night to eat and sleep at a local Tea House on the way. Decent and well facilitated lodge on the way of route serves for the trekkers, as per their desire. The benefit of Tea House Trekking is that, by arranging food and accommodation locally through the guide, you can move at your own pace, set your own schedule and - most importantly - meet and experience the real life of the rural people first hand.

Popular Tea Houses Trek:


Annapurna Region: Annapurna Base Camp Trek, Annapurna Circuit Trek, Annapurna Royal Trek Annapurna Ghorepani "Poonhill",Annapurna Jomsom Muktinath Trek, Tatopani Loop, Gorepani Poon Hill Trek,

Everest Trekking

Everest Base Camp Trek,Everest Panorama,Everest View,Everest Gokyo Ri,

Everest Trek via Jiri, Pike Peak Trek, Lower Khumbu Trek

Langtang & Helambu Treks

Helambu Trek

Langtang Valley

Langtang Gosaikunda, Kathmandu Valley Trek. & Many More.

Camping Trek ( Fully organized Trek):


Camping Trek is a classic style of trekking conducted specially in the remote areas of Nepal. This kind of trek is fully organized and is based on team of work.

The camping trek is the type of trek where all the trekking gear such as tents, mattresses, sleeping bags, toilet tents, kitchen tent, kitchen utensils, etc. will be provided by us as well as a certain number of support staff and a guide based on the size of the group. A Sirdar (chief guide) will be employed to handle the whole trekking program. However, while you are on a camping trek, you will have to stick to the program and schedule which is pre-arranged by the Sirdar. This type of trek is comparatively costly but not the type you would want to miss.

 

Popular Organized Trek:


Mardi Himal, Sikles Tara Hill Top Trek, Royal Trek,Rolwaling to Khumbhu,

Round Mansalu Trek,Makalu Base Camp Trek, Ganesh Himal Trek, Dhaulagir Base Camp Trek, Upper Dolpa Trek, Lower Dolpa Trek, Upper Mustang Trek, Rara Shey Phokshundo Lake Trek, Jumla Simikot Trek, & Many More.

The backpacking
approach of a light pack, stove, freeze-dried food and a tent really is not an appropriate way to trek in Nepal. So much food is available in hill villages that it doesn't make much sense to try to be totally self-sufficient while trekking. This is true throughout Nepal except in the high mountains above 4500 metres. Backpackers violate two cardinal rules for travellers in Nepal. Because they are self-sufficient, they do not contribute to the village economy. Also, they must do so many camp chores that they do not have the time or energy to entertain the villagers that will gather to watch them.

At higher altitudes, however, the backpacking approach works. Depending on the terrain and local weather conditions, villages are found up to 4000 metres, but above this there isn't much accommodation available except in tourist areas such as Annapurna Sanctuary and Everest. It is also difficult to arrange to hire porters who have the proper clothing and footwear for travelling in cold and snow. If you plan to visit these regions, you may wish to alter your trekking style and utilise a backpacking or mountaineering approach to reach high passes or the foot of remote glaciers.

A good solution is to leave much of your gear behind at a temporary "base camp" in the care of a hotel or trustworthy sherpa. You can then spend a few days carrying a reduced load of food and equipment on your own. This will provide you with the best of both worlds: an enriching cultural experience that conforms to the standards and traditions of the country in the lowlands, and a wilderness or mountaineering experience in the high mountains.

TEA HOUSE TREKS:


The Nepali word bhatti translates well as "teahouse". It is a bit pretentious to call some of these village establishments a hotel, but the Nepalese use of English translates restaurant or eating place as "hotel". Since the word hotel has, therefore, been pre-empted, Nepalese use the word "lodge" for sleeping place or hotel. Thus, in the hills of Nepal a "hotel" has food, but may not provide a place to sleep, while a "lodge" always offers accommodation. Many innkeepers specify the services they provide by calling their establishments "Hotel & Lodge". To avoid all this semantic confusion, most people use hotel, lodge and teahouse interchangeably. In reality you can almost always find both accommodation and food at any trailside establishment.

The most popular way to trek in Nepal for both Nepalese and Westerners is to travel from teahouse to teahouse. Hotel accommodation is most readily available in the Khumbu (Everest) region, the Langtang area and the entire Annapurna region. In these areas you can operate with a bare minimum of equipment and rely on teahouses for food and shelter. In this manner, it will cost from US$20 to US$50 a day, depending on where you are and how simply you can live and eat. It becomes much more expensive at high altitudes and in very remote areas.

Most Thakali inns (found along the Pokhara to Jomsom Trek) have bedding available - usually a cotton-filled quilt. Sometimes the bedding has the added attraction of lice and other bed companions. Bring along your own sheet or sleeping bag to provide some protection against these bugs. During the busy trekking seasons in October to November and March to April, it may be difficult to find bedding every night on the Jomsom Trek. Bedding is not usually available at hotels on the Everest trek or around Annapurna, so on these treks you should carry your own sleeping bag.

Although many hotels in the hills are reasonably comfortable, the accommodation in some places may be a dirty, often smoky, home. Chimneys are rare, so a room on the 2nd floor of a house can turn into an intolerable smokehouse as soon as someone lights the cooking fire in the kitchen below. Often it is possible to sleep on porches of houses, but your gear is then less secure. The most common complaint among trekkers who rely on local facilities is about smoky accommodation.

By arranging your food and accommodation locally, you can move at your own pace and set your own schedule. You can move faster or slower than others and make side trips not possible with a large group. You can spend a day photographing mountains, flowers or people - or you can simply lie around for a day. Hotels provide a special meeting place for trekkers from throughout the world. You are free (within the limits imposed by your trekking permit) to alter your route and change your plans to visit other out-of-the-way places as you learn about them. You will have a good opportunity to see how the people in the hills of Nepal live, work and eat and will probably develop at least a rudimentary knowledge of the Nepali language.

You are, however, dependent on facilities in villages or in heavily trekked regions. Therefore you must trek in inhabited areas and on the better known routes. You may need to alter your schedule to reach a certain hotel for lunch or dinner. You can miss a meal if there is no hotel when you need one or if the hotel you are counting on is closed. A few packets of biscuits in your backpack are good insurance against these rough spots. Most of the major routes are well documented, but they are also well travelled. A hotel can be out of food if there are many other trekkers or if you arrive late. You may have to change your planned destination for the day when you discover that the lunch you ordered at an inn will take a very long time to prepare. You will usually make this discovery only after you have already waited an hour or so. It is wise to be aware of these kinds of problems and to prepare yourself to deal with them.

If you deviate from popular routes, be prepared to fend for yourself at times. If, however, you carry food, cooking pots and a tent to use even one night, you have already escalated beyond the teahouse approach into a more complex form of trekking with different problems.
Trekking with Company:

Companies specializing in trekking can organise both individual and group treks. One major advantage to dealing with someone close to home is that it's easy to communicate by phone and the agent can assist you with travel to and from Nepal.

On an arranged trek the group must stay generally on its prearranged route and, within limits, must meet a specific schedule. This means that you may have to forego an appealing side trip or festival and, if you are sick, you will probably have to keep moving with the rest of the group. You also may not agree with a leader's decisions if the schedule must be adjusted because of weather, health, political or logistical considerations.

You will be trekking with people you have not met before. Although some strong friendships may develop, there may also be some in the party you would much rather not have met. For some people, this prospect alone rules out their participation in a group trek.